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Map of Gondor, Rohan, and Mordor from Lord of the Rings




Map of Gondor, Rohan, and Mordor from Lord of the Rings

Map of Gondor, Rohan, and Mordor from Lord of the Rings.

Click on the image to see the full scale drawing.

Version 2018_9_29, including the journey to Mount Doom, and the Paths of the Dead.

Redrawn by Don Hitchcock from the original map by J.R.R. Tolkien.
Credits: References



Map of Gondor, Rohan, and Mordor from Lord of the Rings

This is a version as a .pdf file, which should print well on any printer.

Version 2018_9_29, including the journey to Mount Doom, and the Paths of the Dead.

Credits: References




Map of Gondor, Rohan, and Mordor from Lord of the Rings

This is a very large version, 15604 x 12391 pixels as a .pdf file, 19.3 MB, which would be suitable for a wall poster printed by a commercial printer.

This is Version 2018_9_29, including the journey to Mount Doom, and the Paths of the Dead. If you live in the US, Walmart will print a large format poster for you, at a price. When I looked it up, a 24 inch x 36 inch poster cost $47, but prices may vary.

Credits: References




If you wish, you can create your own wall map, using your own printer, finished size approximately 19 inches by 15 inches depending on your printer settings and the paper you use. If you have access to a large format colour printer such as an A3 size printer, use that.

The following are four .pdf files, the top left, top right, bottom left and bottom right of the large map:

Top left corner of the map

Top right corner of the map

Bottom left corner of the map

Bottom right corner of the map


Click on the links above in turn, and save each of them to your hard disk, as a pdf.

Or you can download them directly, with these links:

Top left corner of the map (automatic download)

Top right corner of the map (automatic download)

Bottom left corner of the map (automatic download)

Bottom right corner of the map (automatic download)


Print them out, preferably using the free program Adobe Acrobat Reader or similar, on your own printer.

The images are overlapped enough so that with care you can glue them together.

Cut just inside the printed, coloured area (don't worry about the outside black line at this stage) of, say, the top right image, vertically with a sharp pair of large scissors, cutting off the white margin your printer has left on the left hand side of the right hand top image. Leave the other white margins at this stage. Turn it over, and put a line of ordinary household (e.g. 'Gluestick') or library glue down the reverse vertical side of it, turn it printed side up again, overlap it with the left hand image so that the images line up, and press down. Turn the two joined pages over, carefully, and glue the strip you have cut off on the join to strengthen it.

Repeat for the bottom two images.

For the joined bottom two images, cut horizontally just inside the printed, coloured area. Turn the joined images over, and put a line of glue on this horizontal edge. Turn them right side up, align with the top two images, and press down.

Glue strengthening strips on the back of all joins.

Get a large piece of card (often called coloured board, a type of very thin cardboard or very thick paper, black works well in this instance) and check that the four combined pages fit easily onto the card.

Cut around the four combined pages just inside the black border I have left on the images, turn it over, and put glue lines along the four sides, as well as in the middle, perhaps in four crosses, as you wish. Turn it right side up, and lay it on the black card, and press down carefully. Allow the glue to dry.



And there you have it! The finished map is now large enough to read all the print, and in my case was 48 cm by 38 cm, or 19 inches by 15 inches.

References

  1. All other images (often altered) unless otherwise attributed are either Public Domain or have been photographed or drawn by Don Hitchcock.

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