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Homo sapiens neanderthalensis

The Spy Neanderthal

Spy Cave
Spy Cave

Sambreville, Belgium.
Photo: Unknown, Public Domain

Spy Cave
Spy Cave entrance in 1927.

Neanderthal remains were found here in 1886.

Photo: Unknown, Public Domain




Spy Cave
The Spy 2 skull which was found in 1886.

Photo: We El
Permission: GNU Free Documentation License




Spy 2 Spy 2



Sculpture of Spy 2.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Artist: Kennis & Kennis Reconstructions
Source and text: Neanderthal Museum, Mettmann, near Düsseldorf, Germany




Spy 2



Close up of the Spy 2 reconstruction. It is a superb piece of sculpture, giving character to the piece.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Artist: Kennis & Kennis Reconstructions
Source and text: Neanderthal Museum, Mettmann, near Düsseldorf, Germany




Spy 2



Femur of Spy 2.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Source and text: Facsimile, Neanderthal Museum, Mettmann, near Düsseldorf, Germany




Spy Cave
Spy Cave entrance today

Photo: Krocat at nl.wikipedia
Permission: GNU Free Documentation License.




Spy Cave
Grotto de Spy or Spy Cave is located 15 km north-east from the town of Spy in Belgium.

Photo and text: https://be.igotoworld.com/en/poi_object/1699_cave-of-spy.htm




Spy Cave
This view to the outside is one that must have been very familiar to the original inhabitants - although the vegetation outside would not have been as lush at that time!

Photo: Bel Adone
Permission: Public Domain




The hominid skeletons discovered during the first excavations have been named Spy I, a female, and Spy 2, a young male. These were dated to around 36 000 BP , although a Bayesian analysis in 2014 concluded that they were probably more than 40,000 years old. The identification of the remains of a Neanderthal child, Spy VI, was published in 2010. The identification was made from an analysis of the mandibular remains and the child is thought to have died at about 18 months, making the Spy Neandertal remains the youngest ever directly dated in northwest Europe.

A paper in Anthropologica et Præhistorica states that the original excavators at Spy did not believe that the remains were deliberately buried in graves but that this hypothesis is now widely accepted.

Almost 12 000 faunal remains of the Pleistocene were discovered, including mammoth, horse, cave hyena, woolly rhinoceros, reindeer, and cave bear bones.

Spy 2
The Spy 2 skeleton

Photo: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, http://rbins.tumblr.com/post/129855515054/neanderthalsofspy




Spy 2
The reconstructed jaw of the Spy 2 Neanderthal.

Photo: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences.




References

  1. Rougier, H., Semal, P., 2013: Spy Cave - 125 years of multidisciplinary research at the Betche aux Rotches (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre, Province of Namur, Belgium) , Volume 1, 2013





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