Recent additions, changes and updates to Don's Maps


Navigation


Back to Don's Maps


walls of china Back to Archaeological Sites

walls of china Back to the hominins index  


Homo Habilis


Homo Habilis was a species of the tribe Hominini, during the Gelasian and early Calabrian stages of the Pleistocene period, which lived between roughly 2.1 and 1.5 million years ago. The type specimen is OH 7, discovered in 1960 at Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, associated with the Oldowan lithic industry; the fossils were identified as a separate species of Homo with the proposed binomial name of Homo Habilis('handy man') in 1964. In its appearance and morphology, Homo Habilis is the least similar to modern humans of all species in the genus Homo (except the equally controversial Homo rudolfensis ), and its classification as Homo has been the subject of controversial debate since its first proposal in the 1960s.

Text above: Wikipedia

Lucy - Australopithecus afarensis



Homo habilis, KNM ER-1813

1 900 000 BP

Koobi Fora, Kenya.

This is a 1 900 000 year old skull discovered in 1973 by Kamoya Kimeu in Koobi Fora, East Turkana, Kenya. This adult skull has a brain size of only 510 cubic centimetres, which is only just above the average for species placed in the Australopithecus genus.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Source and text: facsimile, LVR-Landesmuseum Bonn, Germany
Additional text: https://australianmuseum.net.au/homo-habilis




Lucy - Australopithecus afarensis

Diorama of Homo habilis at a dead hippo. It is a scientific reconstruction of the find of a specific situation from Lake Turkana in East Africa. The age of the find dates between 1.6 and 2 million years.

Homo habilis was not yet able to catch such a large animal as a hippo, and therefore in the drying environment of Africa, had a mostly herbal diet, supplemented by small animals and the found carcasses of dead animals.

Author diorama: Prof. Jan Jelínek
Artwork: Jan Jelínek ml. and Pavel Sabat
Photo: Don Hitchcock 2018
Source and text: Anthropos Pavilion/Moravian Museum, Brno, Czech Republic




Homo habilis Homo habilis


Homo habilis

Homo habilis

Partial cranium and mandible, type specimen, OH 7.

Olduvai, Tanzania. Circa 1 800 000 BP.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Source and text: Facsimile, Vienna Natural History Museum, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien




Lucy - Australopithecus afarensis

Diorama of Homo habilis at a dead hippo, showing here a mother with her child.

Author diorama: Prof. Jan Jelínek
Artwork: Jan Jelínek ml. and Pavel Sabat
Photo: Don Hitchcock 2018
Source and text: Anthropos Pavilion/Moravian Museum, Brno, Czech Republic




Homo habilis

Homo habilis

Skull, KNM-ER 1813.

Koobi Fora, Kenya.

Circa 1 900 000 BP.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Source and text: Facsimile, Vienna Natural History Museum, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien




Homo habilis

Homo habilis

Skull, OH 24.

Olduvai, Tanzania.

Circa 1 900 000 BP - 1 800 000 BP.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Source and text: Facsimile, Vienna Natural History Museum, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien




Lucy - Australopithecus afarensis

A digging stick, possibly also used as a club for small animals or birds on occasion, was a necessary tool item for Homo habilis.

Author diorama: Prof. Jan Jelínek
Artwork: Jan Jelínek ml. and Pavel Sabat
Photo: Don Hitchcock 2018
Source and text: Anthropos Pavilion/Moravian Museum, Brno, Czech Republic
Additional text: Don Hitchcock




chopper

Chopper

Olduvai, Tanzania.

Circa 1 800 000 BP - 1 500 000 BP.

Photo: Don Hitchcock 2015
Source and text: Facsimile, Vienna Natural History Museum, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien




Homo naledi timeline


Hominin timeline.

Note that Homo floresiensis has not been placed on this timeline. van den Bergh et al. (2016) indicate that it may be a form of Homo erectus.

Photo: © National Geographic, Jason Treat, NGM staff
Source: Lee Berger, University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), John Hawks, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Proximate source: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/05/homo-naledi-human-evolution-science/




References

  1. Dean, M., Smith, B., 2009: The First Humans – Origin and Early Evolution of the Genus Homo Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology, Springer Netherlands
  2. van den Bergh G. et al., 2016: Homo floresiensis-like fossils from the early Middle Pleistocene of Flores, Nature, 534 (7606): 245–248. doi:10.1038/nature17999. PMID 27279221.





Back to Don's Maps


walls of china Back to Archaeological Sites